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19.06.2013

18:37 Uhr

Obamas Rede im Wortlaut

„The wall belongs to history. But we have history to make as well"

Präsident Obama ist nach Berlin gekommen, um Geschichte zu schreiben. Vor den Augen von hunderten von Menschen fordert er zur weltweiten Abrüstung von Atomwaffen auf. Die Rede im englischen Wortlaut zum Nachlesen.

Eine halbe Stunde sprach US-Präsident Barack Obama vor dem Brandenburger Tor zu den Menschen. ap

Eine halbe Stunde sprach US-Präsident Barack Obama vor dem Brandenburger Tor zu den Menschen.

BerlinHello, Berlin! (Applause.) Thank you, Chancellor Merkel, for your leadership, your friendship, and the example of your life -- from a child of the East to the leader of a free and united Germany. As I’ve said, Angela and I don’t exactly look like previous German and American leaders. But the fact that we can stand here today, along the fault line where a city was divided, speaks to an eternal truth: No wall can stand against the yearning of justice, the yearnings for freedom, the yearnings for peace that burns in the human heart. (Applause.)

Mayor Wowereit, distinguished guests, and especially the people of Berlin and of Germany -- thank you for this extraordinarily warm welcome. In fact, it's so warm and I feel so good that I'm actually going to take off my jacket, and anybody else who wants to, feel free to. (Applause.) We can be a little more informal among friends. (Applause.)

Obamas Rede auf Deutsch: „Keine Mauer kann dem Drang nach Frieden stand halten“

Obamas Rede auf Deutsch

„Keine Mauer kann dem Drang nach Frieden stand halten“

US-Präsident Obama hat vor dem Brandenburger Tor eine mit Spannung erwartete Rede gehalten. Vor den Augen von hunderten von Menschen fordert er zur weltweiten Abrüstung von Atomwaffen auf. Die Rede in deutschen Wortlaut.

As your Chancellor mentioned, five years ago I had the privilege to address this city as senator. Today, I'm proud to return as President of the United States. (Applause.) And I bring with me the enduring friendship of the American people, as well as my wife, Michelle, and Malia and Sasha. (Applause.) You may notice that they're not here. The last thing they want to do is to listen to another speech from me. (Laughter.) So they're out experiencing the beauty and the history of Berlin. And this history speaks to us today.

Here, for thousands of years, the people of this land have journeyed from tribe to principality to nation-state; through Reformation and Enlightenment, renowned as a “land of poets and thinkers,” among them Immanuel Kant, who taught us that freedom is the “unoriginated birthright of man, and it belongs to him by force of his humanity.”

Here, for two centuries, this gate stood tall as the world around it convulsed -- through the rise and fall of empires; through revolutions and republics; art and music and science that reflected the height of human endeavor, but also war and carnage that exposed the depths of man’s cruelty to man.

It was here that Berliners carved out an island of democracy against the greatest of odds. As has already been mentioned, they were supported by an airlift of hope, and we are so honored to be joined by Colonel Halvorsen, 92 years old -- the original “candy bomber.” We could not be prouder of him. (Applause.) I hope I look that good, by the way, when I'm 92. (Laughter.)

During that time, a Marshall Plan seeded a miracle, and a North Atlantic Alliance protected our people. And those in the neighborhoods and nations to the East drew strength from the knowledge that freedom was possible here, in Berlin -- that the waves of crackdowns and suppressions might therefore someday be overcome.

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