MenüZurück
Wird geladen.

Imagining Arminius

The battle of Teutoburg Forest

On the track of Germany's founding rout and its first hero.

  • zurück
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • vor
Imagining Arminius, here depicted taking leave from his lover Thusnelda. Johannes Gehrts: Armin verabschiedet sich von Thusnelda, 1884

Imagining Arminius, here depicted taking leave from his lover Thusnelda.

Bild: Johannes Gehrts: Armin verabschiedet sich von Thusnelda, 1884

This work from 1870 and 1873 shows Hermann in the battle that transformed the country. Wikimedia, Peter Janssen, Kunstmuseen Krefeld

This work from 1870 and 1873 shows Hermann in the battle that transformed the country.

Bild: Wikimedia, Peter Janssen, Kunstmuseen Krefeld

A large-scale model in the Kalkriese museum of the most striking find: an iron face mask from a Roman cavalryman's helmet. Hermann Pentermann, Museum und Park Kalkriese

A large-scale model in the Kalkriese museum of the most striking find: an iron face mask from a Roman cavalryman's helmet.

Bild: Hermann Pentermann, Museum und Park Kalkriese

Restoration of the Roman cavalryman’s face mask. Museum und Park Kalkriese

Restoration of the Roman cavalryman’s face mask.

Bild: Museum und Park Kalkriese

Tips of Roman “pilum” javelins and arrowheads found at the Kalkriese battleground some 15 kilometers north of Osnabrück. Hermann Pentermann, Museum und Park Kalkriese

Tips of Roman “pilum” javelins and arrowheads found at the Kalkriese battleground some 15 kilometers north of Osnabrück.

Bild: Hermann Pentermann, Museum und Park Kalkriese

Part of a 400-meter stretch of earthen wall uncovered at Kalkriese years ago was first thought to have been Germanic. New archaeological findings show it was probably part of a hastily-erected Roman fort. Axel Thiele, Park und Museum Kalkriese

Part of a 400-meter stretch of earthen wall uncovered at Kalkriese years ago was first thought to have been Germanic. New archaeological findings show it was probably part of a hastily-erected Roman fort.

Bild: Axel Thiele, Park und Museum Kalkriese

Every two years, the Kalkriese battle is re-enacted at a festival showing what Roman and Germanic life was like 2,000 years ago. Heinz Hoppe, Park und Museum Kalkriese

Every two years, the Kalkriese battle is re-enacted at a festival showing what Roman and Germanic life was like 2,000 years ago.

Bild: Heinz Hoppe, Park und Museum Kalkriese

  • zurück
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • vor

Weitere Galerien

Direkt vom Startbildschirm zu Handelsblatt.com

Auf tippen, dann auf „Zum Home-Bildschirm“ hinzufügen.

Auf tippen, dann „Zum Startbildschirm“ hinzufügen.

×